Alluring Future of the Aerospace Industry

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The Imagination Behind the Aerospace Industry

The aerospace industry has been able to evolve continuously since its inception with enthusiastic experts and innovative thinkers, pushing the boundaries. Without that child-like wonder, that drives curiosity and tends to never truly fade away, those in the field would never feel the need to wonder what could be. Imagine a world where nobody ever wondered what it would be like to soar like the birds.

Luckily, it has been in the nature of humans to turn every major innovation into the foundation for future endeavors. With fresh eyes, every invention can be improved, simplified, or even be made to be more accessible to possible consumers. This has led to many exciting accomplishments in the aerospace industry, from passenger planes to rockets venturing farther into space than ever thought imaginable.

When innovating, thinkers want to be outside the box. Unfortunately, they must consider the tools available to them. Their passion and interest are passed down in the form of their creations, sparking the interest of the youth. The youth, who have the time to analyze the resources available to them through an unfiltered perspective. No boundaries or limits, simple reasoning that can be pieced together and made real over time. This is how the aerospace industry has been able to continuously evolve.

Pressing Forward to Innovation

Today’s world has become nearly completely accessible by means of the aerospace industry. We can travel from state to state, country to country, or even just get a good vantage point to jump onto the peak of a mountain for some extreme snowboarding. Though, we have been able to do that for a few decades now. It is in our nature to strive for more.

True innovation will make changes to societal norms and how we see the future. Ever since we have been able to leave Earth’s atmosphere, there has been an ambition to go farther and do more in the final frontier. These types of ambition can lead to a need for regulation in unexplored territory. As seen in an article posted by CNN “Space industry year ahead: SpaceX’s Mars rocket, tourism, and more billionaire battles“, where the following was showcased:

Similar questions about how to regulate outer space in the age of commercialization are playing out on the international stage. With SpaceX and others putting up thousands of satellites for a new space-based businesses, and a recent satellite destruction test carried out by the Russian government — concerns about overcrowding in Earth’s orbit are mounting.Similar questions about how to regulate outer space in the age of commercialization are playing out on the international stage. With SpaceX and others putting up thousands of satellites for a new space-based businesses, and a recent satellite destruction test carried out by the Russian government — concerns about overcrowding in Earth’s orbit are mounting.

There were numerous recent, high-profile events highlighting the stakes of the problem: SpaceX Starlink satellites nearly collided with the Chinese space station, the International Space Station has had to maneuver out of the path of debris on numerous occasions, and defunct rockets have fallen out of orbit uncontrolled.

Groups within the United Nations have been working for decades to update international treaties governing the use of outer space. So far, they’ve been largely unsuccessful. But the effort is gaining attention once again with a November 1 resolution that created an open-ended working group that will assess “current and future threats to space operations, determine when behavior may be considered irresponsible, ‘make recommendations on possible norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviors,’ and contribute to the negotiation of legally binding instruments; — including a treaty to prevent ‘an arms race in space,'” according to a recently published article written by two space policy experts.

CNN “Space industry year ahead: SpaceX’s Mars rocket, tourism, and more billionaire battles”

These sorts of political issues can be the true enemy of pushing forward with innovation, though it can be very necessary at times. Without regulations in place, the aerospace industry could be a truly dangerous field to innovate in. As shown above, regulation discussions come about as issues pop up. There was no need to discuss the issue of space debris until beyond our atmosphere became difficult to maneuver. As humans, we can only predict so much that will take place from our innovations. We tend to analyze the positives first.

These discussions have also become much more relevant lately as private companies get involved in space travel. Something decades ago seemed unthinkable. This was also represented in an article posted by CNN “Space industry year ahead: SpaceX’s Mars rocket, tourism, and more billionaire battles“, where it is said that “Richard Branson’s and Jeff Bezos’ space companies have for years been working to develop spacecraft capable of taking paying customers on brief, supersonic trips to the edge of space. In 2021, both billionaires made their own treks to the edge of space aboard their respective spacecraft.”.

The same article specifies that both flights went off without a hitch and led the businessmen to urge more traffic to space tourism, the new sector taking off in the aerospace industry. They would do so with complimentary trips given to some elite guests, in an attempt to make a space trip a sort of status symbol. Which, in my opinion, is certainly a status symbol. The ability to venture into space used to seem like an activity reserved for professional astronauts that can withstand certain environments.

Does Leaving Earth Mean Leaving Its Problems?

As seen in the quoted article, regulation and human error is simply baggage we will bring with us into the unknown. Like a New Year, space certainly does seem like a fresh start. A chance to do it right with all of the knowledge we have been able to accumulate. Though, this is only a vision if the right people are not assembled to oversee our expansion into space.

The aerospace industry may soar high, but issues from the ground will never cease to interrupt. The following article excerpt from CNN’s ” “Space industry year ahead: SpaceX’s Mars rocket, tourism, and more billionaire battles” discusses labor issues involved in this current innovative run:

Blue Origin, meanwhile, has faced its own controversies, though none that have indicated specific safety issues with its rocket or spacecraft. Rather, a group of 21 current and former employees co-signed a letter alleging the company operates a toxic work environment where “professional dissent” is “actively stifled.” Blue Origin responded to the claims by saying it has “no tolerance for discrimination or harassment of any kind.”

The essay prompted enough concern for the FAA to launch a review. But reporting from CNN Business also revealed that FAA investigators assigned to the task were hamstrung by a lack of legal protections for whistleblowers in the commercial spaceflight industry.

Emails obtained by CNN Business showed the review was closed even though investigators never had the chance to speak with any of the people who anonymously signed the whistleblower essay.

The situation again highlighted the complexity of the commercial space industry’s federally designated “learning period” — a designation that effectively bars regulators from implementing certain new rules or wielding the same oversight powers it does for other industries.

hat designation is set to expire in 2023, and the FAA indicated that lawmakers are monitoring the situation and considering a change. The whole thing could also soon become the subject of a Government Accountability Office report. Emails obtained by CNN Business show the GAO reached out to the FAA for more information about its Blue Origin probe.

Meanwhile, the allegations about Blue Origin’s workplace culture — which were echoed in a separate whistleblower essay about SpaceX — has put the commercial space industry under heightened scrutiny.

CNN “Space industry year ahead: SpaceX’s Mars rocket, tourism, and more billionaire battles”

With the understanding that we are not leaving the issues of the human race behind as we exit our atmosphere, discussions of regulations cannot come soon enough. A fresh start should be taken seriously, not just a status symbol for the rich. We look to key industry figures to make this transition as safe as possible, as those capable of NDT inspections. AMI Aero Marine Interior, Inc. has the necessary experience to ensure safe travel for the aerospace industry. We also look to our experts in conservation as to not bring ruin to other planets, that we truly do not yet understand.

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